Broccoli Sprouts a Super Food?

🎩 hat Tip to: Dr. Patrick trained as a postdoctoral fellow at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute.

Broccoli sprouts are concentrated sources of sulforaphane, a type of isothiocyanate. Damaging broccoli sprouts – when chewing, chopping, or freezing – triggers an enzymatic reaction in the tiny plants that produces sulforaphane. Broccoli sprouts are concentrated sources of sulforaphane, a type of isothiocyanate. Damaging broccoli sprouts – when chewing, chopping, or freezing – triggers an enzymatic reaction in the tiny plants that produces sulforaphane.

Get your sprouting guide free with this link https://www.foundmyfitness.com/sprouting?via=sprouting_qa_episode

A note from Rhonda...

I became an avid sprouter several years ago after coming across the fascinating research of Dr. Jed Fahey, a nutritional biochemist with a broad, extensive background in plant physiology, human nutrition, and phytochemistry.

The bulk of Dr. Fahey’s work has focused on glucosinolates and their byproducts – isothiocyanates. Of particular interest is sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli. Sulforaphane is a potent inducer of key enzymes that promote detoxification of carcinogens in humans, but it also shows promise as a therapeutic agent against a wide range of other diseases, including autism, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, among others. Dr. Fahey discovered that broccoli sprouts are an exceptionally rich and consistent source of sulforaphane.

We get lots of questions about sprouting here at FMF, so we sat down with Dr. Fahey and got the lowdown on how it’s done. And now we’re sharing that information with you!

Special thanks to Dr. Patrick for your hard work and guidance in helping us get and stay healthy. Tommy’s Blog

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